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20130117
20130125
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as it was four years ago. make sure you know that what we are celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president, what we are doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy, not only of our past, but also of our future. god bless you. i love you. we will see you tomorrow. [applause] ♪ ["we take care of our own"] ♪ ♪ ["only in america"] ♪ >> as part of our inauguration fightge, the u.s. army's and drum corps -- they will escort president obama down pennsylvania avenue during the inaugural parade. ♪ [drum line] >> it began in april with the production team. it prepares the materials, the music, the drill that we do. parade marching does not require quadrilles, but we do a great deal of research with 18th-century music portrayed on modern instruments that aren't -- that are reminiscent of instruments during the revolutionary war. the rangers a range of vignettes -- are arranged vignettes music from the 18th century that has m
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
an honorary member after the 1994 election. >> the people that listen to ten hours of talk radio a week or more voted republican by a three-two-one margin. those are the people that elected the new congress. that's why this is the limbaugh congress. >> as of today, i think we can finally put this book where it belongs in history. right there. the american people have put the brakes on the conservative train that has run over a lot of people in this country. president obama has laid down a different track for america. the president's inauguration yesterday served as proof of a real movement in this country. we are a society now of tolerance, fairness, and acceptance. the country is not afraid of progressive values, or to say the word, liberal, because most of the country believes in progressive liberal values. a majority of americans believe gay marriage should be legal. most people don't want any cuts whatsoever to social security. even more people want medicare left alone. only 33% want to protect defense spending. on immigration, the majority believes, well, the path for citizenship f
to do which is represent the people of the united states. we have a democratically elected republic and people need to pull out their history books and find out what that is and realize that when we send them to office, would give them the authority to vote the way we feel and if we feel they are not representing our opinions and needs, we need to replace them. thank you very much. host: stephen dinan will be joining us at the bottom of the hour. later, author and historian richard norton smith will dig in the details of the second term and what this president could be facing. this headline is from "the washington examiner" -- the public information officer for the u.s. capitol police is joining us on the fund. guest: for having me. host: we look at the seams around washington, what can visitors expect tomorrow? guest: they should expect that we will do our best to protect people. give time to get through lines and things of that nature. host: this is a map we found this morning in "the washington post." the area in red it will be the high-security area. many of the roads around the
it was unanimous that george washington had been elected president. the first thing they had to doffs notify washington he needed to come to take his oath of office. it took a little while for presidents of the united states in those days to get to wherever the federal government was so they had a couple of weeks to work things out. well the first thing they did was to write an oath for everybody else to take including the vice president of the united states. congress write it is oath that every other person who works for the government from military to judges to the legitimate tors. that is an oath written by congress and it's changed over the centuries. but the oath the president takes is unique. it's in the constitution and it's never changed. so the question was where are we going to swear in the president of the united states? well congress is meeting in federal hall on wall street. and it was a nice building. the house had the bigger room downstairs and the senate had the smaller room upstairs. and they said the president should be sworn in in our chamber. that was fine except everybod
having been re-elected, having been reaffirmed by the american people in the role as the first family in an odd way we were voting on them as first family. and the american people said, you know what? we may disagree with him on policy and we don't trust him on social security, whatever, but we kind of like that family. we kind of trust that family, and that's -- >> how did they do it? >> by working very hard at being normal. >> right. >> as joy said, stylish, but normal. and i think to see them so comfortable now is a reflection not only of them but of the country. whatever else you want to say, whatever other arguments we're going to have about entitlements, about war, about medicare, about medicaid, it's not going to be about having an african-american first family because they have done it so beautifully. and by the way, to have walked the tightrope of race the way they have, having come up as baby boomers in the affirmative action era when people thought, hey, wait a minute, maybe they don't deserve it, they've got to prove themselves, barack and michelle have proved themselves i
. >> good afternoon. i am the first elected of newtown, the scene of the most horrific event that took place at sandy hook elementary school in which we lost 26 children and staff members. i am here to show support for those initiatives late out today by vice president biden and president obama. both of those members said our world has changed because of what happened at sandy hook. par contest as has been raised. we have the obligation to address. if that is so, change will take place. i would hate to find myself a year from now reading about another of that -- another event. i truly believe the will of the people make a difference. i am calling on everyone to have the courage to stand up and help us make that difference. we should never again visit a tragedy such as we had in newtown. i call on everyone of you as mothers and fathers and members of a reasonable society to know it is time for us to make a change. please do everything you can to support common sense policies. we need to know that we are the answer to this problem. thank you. >> hi, i'm president of the brady campaign. i come
back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. he was elected to four terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? guest: great question. >> you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term presidencies before that. that became the norm. host: let me share with ronald reagan said in january of 1987. state of union address. there was the iran-contra sc andal. [video clip] >> i have one major regret. i took a risk with our action in regards to iran. it did not work. for that, i accept full responsibility. it was not wrong to try to save lives. certainly, it was not wrong to try to secur
four, five years ago the president of the us u then senator, promised if elected, by the end of my first term, i'm going to cut that first deficit in half. we didn't hear anything about that yesterday. in fact, it sounded more like spend, spend, spend, and in fact, if you're just waking up, you were sleeping through the speech yesterday, the main speech point was whatever you need, middle class, we're going to give it to you. >> brian: education, roads, communication, networks, science, labs, a lot of investment in infrastructure, which means investment infrastructure means do you need revenue? to get revenue, you raise taxes. >> gretchen: you lint like what he was talking about, maybe you liked that it was short. under 20 minutes. we heard that one president in history gave a two-hour speech. >> brian: and he died. >> steve: he did. >> gretchen: he did soon after of pneumonia. let's talk about that whole idea of the middle class, though, because these are the facts, folks. the median household income in 2007 was $54,489. of course, that was before the banks collapsed and before th
with their elected officials. i wanted to make the book accessible and i had recommendations to help them do that. >> the former head of the federal deposit insurance corporation on the government's role during the crisis. her book is "bull by the horns," sunday night on "q &a." >> [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [video clip] "washington journal"is next. the conversation on reducing gun violence continues. we will ask a gun owners to call in during the first hour and the round table and possible new gun laws. laws.
the right thing. thank you. [applause] >> now it gives me great pleasure to introduce a newly elected colleague from connecticut who will introduce our first witness and that is congresswoman elizabeth evidenty -- esty from connecticut and in whose district sandy hook elementary school resides. and what we will do is to have all of the various members introduced -- introduce our witnesses and then we will proceed with the testimony. congresswoman esty. >> thank you so much to my good friend rosa delauro. and thanks to all of you for being with us here today as witnesses to what happened in our community of newtown, connecticut, and as a call to action for what we must do as a country. i'm honored today to have the chance to interdues janet robinson who has become a good friend, who is a true american hero who responded in a time of unbelievable tragedy. for five years dr. janet robinson has served as the superintendent of schools in newtown, connecticut. throughout her career she has shown a constant and loving commitment to education and emproving the lives of children. in addition t
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11